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Descriptive study of chronic calcific pancreatitis in Sri Lanka

Authors:

Mohan de Silva ,

Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayawardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka., LK
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Silva Selliah,

Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Talagolla Road, Ragama, Sri Lanka, LK
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Ira Thabrew

Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Talagolla Road, Ragama, Sri Lanka, LK
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Abstract

Objectives To describe the potential risk factors, clinical features, biochemical and radiological features, and management of chronic calcific pancreatitis.
Design Cross-sectional descriptive study.
Setting Tertiary care general hospital.
Patients Fifty patients with pancreatic calcification referred to the Colombo South Teaching Hospital, and 50 age-matched controls from healthy relatives or friends of the patients.
Measurement Height and weight measurements, immuno-reactive insulin levels and trypsin levels of duodenal aspirates were estimated. Plain abdominal xray and ultrasonography were performed.
Intervention Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) was attempted on all patients during which duodenal aspirates were collected. Success rates of ERCP and response to endotherapeutic procedures were recorded.
Results Twenty two of the 50 chronic calcific pancreatitis (CP) patients were diagnosed to have chronic alcoholic calcific pancreatitis (CACP). Mean age of the CACP patients was significantly higher than that of the chronic calcific pancreatitis of the tropics (CCPT) patients. Severe malnutrition (BMI < 20), frequent consumption of Manihot esculenta (manioc, cassava) and a high consumption of chilli or pepper were identified as possible risk factors for both alcoholic and non-alcoholic CP. Onset of diabetes occurred at a much younger age in the CCPT group than in the CACP group. Mean serum insulin was significantly higher in the CCPT group than in the CACP group and duodenal trypsin level was significantly lower in the CCPT than in CACP group.
Conclusions Our results confirm the existence of both alcoholic (CACP) and non-alcoholic (CCPT) types of chronic calcific pancreatitis in Sri Lanka. A larger study is required to confirm the associated risk factors such as Manihot esculenta and foods with a high content of chilli or pepper.

Key words: Alcoholic and non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, malnutrition and consumption of Manihot esculenta

DOI: 10.4038/cmj.v50i1.1580

Ceylon Medical Journal Vol.50(1) 2005 pp5-10

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v50i1.1581
How to Cite: de Silva, M., Selliah, S. and Thabrew, I., 2010. Descriptive study of chronic calcific pancreatitis in Sri Lanka. Ceylon Medical Journal, 50(1), pp.5–10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v50i1.1581
Published on 04 Feb 2010.
Peer Reviewed

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