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Morbidity pattern and household cost of hospitalisation for non-communicable diseases (NCDs): a cross-sectional study at tertiary care level

Authors:

A Kasturiratne ,

Department of Community and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya., LK
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AR Wickremasinghe,

Department of Community and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya., LK
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A de Silva

Department of Economics, Faculty of Arts, University of Colombo, LK
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Abstract

Objective To determine the pattern of morbidity and the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of patients seeking in-patient services for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in medical units of a tertiary care hospital, and to estimate the economic burden imposed by these admissions on the households.

Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in medical units of the Colombo North Teaching Hospital, Ragama. Data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire. Morbidity patterns and demographic and socio-economic characteristics of patients with NCDs were determined. Direct and indirect components of the household cost of hospital stay were estimated.

Results Fifty five per cent of the patients men male and the largest age group (11%) was 50-54 years. Seventy per cent were above 40 years of age, and 63% represented social classes 4 and 5. Diseases of the circulatory system were the commonest (31%). Median household cost of the total hospital stay was Rs. 852.00 (inter-quartile range Rs. 351.00-1885.00) of which 70% were direct costs. Median daily cost was Rs. 340.00 (interquartile range Rs.165.00-666.00). Only 44% of patients incurred an indirect cost. Cost of travelling was the main contributor (36%) to the household cost. Laboratory investigations contributed 16%.

Conclusions Most patients seeking in-patient services were from a poor socioeconomic background. The economic burden imposed by the admission to the household was mainly due to direct costs incurred for travelling and investigations.

Key words: Government hospitals; household costs; in-patient care; non-communicable diseases

DOI: 10.4038/cmj.v50i3.1427

Ceylon Medical Journal Vol.50(3) 2005: 109-113

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v50i3.1427
How to Cite: Kasturiratne, A., Wickremasinghe, A. and de Silva, A., 2009. Morbidity pattern and household cost of hospitalisation for non-communicable diseases (NCDs): a cross-sectional study at tertiary care level. Ceylon Medical Journal, 50(3), pp.109–113. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v50i3.1427
Published on 09 Dec 2009.
Peer Reviewed

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