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Original article

Bladder cancer in women: a Sri Lankan study

Authors:

Serozsha A. S. Goonewardena ,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, LK
About Serozsha A. S.
Department of Urology
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Umesh Jayarajah,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, LK
About Umesh
Department of Urology
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M. V. Chandu de Silva,

University of Colombo, LK
About M. V. Chandu
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine
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Sanka N. Kuruppu,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, LK
About Sanka N.
Department of Urology
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D. M. Hilary Fernando,

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, LK
About D. M. Hilary
Department of Urology
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Kasun B. Herath

National Hospital of Sri Lanka, LK
About Kasun B.
Department of Urology
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Abstract

Introduction

Bladder cancer (BC) is the ninth commonest cancer globally, and ranks 19th among women. The literature on BC in women is sparse, and the knowledge on the variations of tumour characteristics in South Asian female BC is limited. The objective of this study was to describe the clinicopathological characteristics of BC in women and compare them with male BC.

 

Methods

A retrospective analysis of all female patients with histopathologically proven newly diagnosed primary BC from January 2007 to January 2017 was done at the Urology Unit, National Hospital of Sri Lanka, and the findings were compared with men with BC during the same period.   


Results

There were 314 patients with primary BC, of which 55(17.5%) were women, with a male:female ratio of 4.7:1. Only 70.9% of women had haematuria at presentation. Forty-four women (80%) had urothelial bladder cancers(UBC). The mean age of women with UBC was 67±SD13.2 years, and for non-urothelial bladder cancers(NUBC) was 62.5±SD 12.7 years. NUBC in women accounted for a disproportionately higher percentage in comparison to men (20% vs.5.4%, p<0.001). Of the UBCs, muscle invasive BC accounted for 45.5% (20/44) in women as opposed to 33.5% (82/245) in men. Women had a significantly higher proportion of solid tumours (40%vs.22.8%,p=0.008) compared to men.

 

Conclusion

Primary BC in women has a significantly higher proportion of NUBC and muscle invasive UBC, which are more aggressive cancers, compared to men.  Furthermore, the lack of haematuria in >25%, and higher incidental diagnosis, with inherently thinner bladder wall, makes primary BC in women more likely to present late, in a more advanced state.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v64i3.8952
How to Cite: Goonewardena, S.A.S., Jayarajah, U., de Silva, M.V.C., Kuruppu, S.N., Fernando, D.M.H. and Herath, K.B., 2019. Bladder cancer in women: a Sri Lankan study. Ceylon Medical Journal, 64(3), pp.98–102. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v64i3.8952
Published on 30 Sep 2019.
Peer Reviewed

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