Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of frontline and non-frontline healthcare workers in...

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Original articles

Impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of frontline and non-frontline healthcare workers in Sri Lanka

Authors:

Anuradha Baminiwatta ,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
About Anuradha
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya
X close

Shamila De Silva,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
About Shamila
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya
X close

Aruni Hapangama,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
About Aruni
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya
X close

Kumarini Basnayake,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
X close

Charani Abayaweera,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
X close

Dinithi Kulasinghe,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
X close

Dewmi Kaushalya,

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
X close

Shehan Williams

North Colombo Teaching Hospital, Ragama, LK
About Shehan
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya
X close

Abstract

Introduction: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of mental health problems during a pandemic. Being stationed at the frontline or not may have implications on their mental health.


Objectives: The aims of this study were to assess depression, anxiety and stress among HCWs, to explore differences between frontline and non-frontline workers, and to investigate associated factors.


Methods: In this cross-sectional study, frontline and non-frontline HCWs were recruited from a COVID-19 screening hospital in Sri Lanka. Mental health impact was assessed using Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Sociodemographic data and perceptions of social and occupational circumstances were gathered. Categorical variables were analyzed using Chi square and logistic regression. Odds ratios were calculated for the effect of different perceptions on psychological morbidity.


Results: A total of 467 HCWs participated, comprising 244 (52.2%) frontline and 223 (47.8%) non-frontline workers, with female preponderance (n=341, 77%). Prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among HCWs were 19.5%, 20.6%, 11.8%, respectively. Non-frontline group showed a higher prevalence of depression (27% vs. 11%, p<0.001), anxiety (27% vs. 14%, p=0.001) and stress (15% vs. 8%, p=0.026). Being married, having children, living with family and higher income were associated with better psychological outcomes. Perceived lack of personal protective equipment, inadequate support from hospital authorities, greater discrimination, and lack of training to cope with the situation predicted poor mental health outcomes, and non-frontline HCWs were more likely to hold such perceptions.


Conclusion: Addressing factors leading to negative psychological outcomes in HCWs should be a key concern during this pandemic.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v66i1.9351
How to Cite: Baminiwatta, A., De Silva, S., Hapangama, A., Basnayake, K., Abayaweera, C., Kulasinghe, D., Kaushalya, D. and Williams, S., 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of frontline and non-frontline healthcare workers in Sri Lanka. Ceylon Medical Journal, 66(1), pp.16–31. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v66i1.9351
Published on 30 Jul 2021.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus