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Alcohol use and alcoholic fatty liver disease: a prospective, communitybased study among adults in an urban community in Sri Lanka

Authors:

Madunil Anuk Niriella ,

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Madunil
Faculty of Medicine
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Anuradhani Kasturiratne,

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Anuradhani
Faculty of Medicine
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Thulani Beddage,

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Thulani
Faculty of Medicine
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Shamila Thivanshi De Silva,

University of Kelaniya
About Shamila
Faculty of Medicine
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Anuradha Supun Dassanayake,

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Anuradha
Faculty of Medicine
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Arunasalam Pathmeswaran,

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Arunasalam
Faculty of Medicine
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Ananda Rajitha Wickramasinghe,

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Ananda
Faculty of Medicine
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Norihiro Kato,

National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Toyama, JP
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Hithanadura Janaka de Silva

University of Kelaniya, LK
About Hithanadura
Faculty of Medicine
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Abstract

Background: Data on alcoholic fatty liver (AFL) is limited. Therefore, we investigated alcohol use and AFL in a cohort of adults in an urban community in Sri Lanka.

 

Methods: The study population (selected by age-stratified random sampling) was screened in 2007 (35-64 years) and re-evaluated in 2014. They were assessed by structured interviews, anthropometric measurements, liver-ultrasound, and biochemical and serological tests. AFL was diagnosed on ultrasound criteria, ‘unsafe’ alcohol consumption (Asian standards: males>14 units, females >7 units per week) and absence of hepatitis B/C markers. Controls were unsafe alcohol consumers who had no fatty liver on ultrasound.

 

Results: 2985/3012 (99%) had complete data for analysis. 272/2985 (9.1%) were unsafe-drinkers in 2007 [males-270; mean-age-51.9, SD-8.0 years]. 86/272 (31.6%) had AFL [males-85; mean-age-50.2, SD-8.6 years]. Male gender [p<0.001], increased waist circumference (WC) [OR 4.9, p<0.01], BMI>23kg/m2 [OR 3.5, p<0.01] and raised alanine aminotransferase (ALT) [OR 2.8, p<0.01] were independently associated with AFL. 173/272 (63.6%) unsafe alcohol consumers from 2007 were re-evaluated in 2014. 134/173 had either had AFL or had changed to ‘safe’ or no alcohol consumption. 21/39 (53.8%) [males-21 (100%), meanage- 57.9, SD-7.9 years] who remained ‘unsafe’ alcohol users who had no fatty liver in 2007 developed AFL after 7-years (annual incidence 7.7%). On bivariate analysis, only male gender was associated with new-onset AFL. Of the 42 who had AFL at baseline but changed their drinking status from unsafe to safe or no alcohol, 6 had resolution of fatty liver in 2014.

 

Conclusion: In this community-based study among adults from an urban community, unsafe alcohol use was found in 9.1%. Among unsafe alcohol users, the prevalence of AFL was 31.6% and the annual incidence of AFL was 7.7%. New-onset AFL was independently associated with male gender.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v67i2.9630
How to Cite: Niriella, M.A., Kasturiratne, A., Beddage, T., De Silva, S.T., Dassanayake, A.S., Pathmeswaran, A., Wickramasinghe, A.R., Kato, N. and de Silva, H.J., 2022. Alcohol use and alcoholic fatty liver disease: a prospective, communitybased study among adults in an urban community in Sri Lanka. Ceylon Medical Journal, 67(2), pp.45–51. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cmj.v67i2.9630
Published on 19 Oct 2022.
Peer Reviewed

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